Early Childhood Education: A Tool to Break the Cycle of Poverty and Homelessness

A couple of weeks ago I saw a mother duck with her ducklings following in tow.

As I watched them, it reminded me of how small children follow their teachers in classrooms and brought back fond memories of my kindergarten teacher, Mrs. Kertin. In my eyes, Mrs. Kertin was the best! I remember reciting the alphabet, sounding out words, reading in a circle on the primary-colored carpet and most of all being chosen to clap the chalk out of the erasers and assisting with catching copies from the mimeograph machine.

Each day 300 low-income, three- and four-year-olds have a similar experience with staff from Human Services in the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program (ECEAP).  A family of four would make no more than $26,730 per year. There are seven ECEAP locations and nine programs throughout Pierce County: Orting, Bonney Lake, Buckley, Eatonville, University Place, Sumner and South Hill Puyallup. Each unique site has its own cozy appeal. Every staff member is caring and encouraging. Watching the classroom full of three- and four-year-olds is heartwarming. Like a mother duck, they follow their teacher. In Orting for example, their interaction with teacher Peggy Baublits reminded me of the kindred spirit of Mrs. Kertin.  Peggy has nurtured children at Orting ECEAP for nine years while providing clear expectations that set no limitations on their abilities or potential.

In addition to teachers, all ECEAP sites have Family Support Workers (FSW). They assist families with parenting skills, healthy eating habits, community resources, vision screenings, and more to encourage families to take an active role in their child’s education. Mercedes, Orting’s FSW, identified two children this year with vision concerns and referred them to ophthalmologists. One child was prescribed glasses and the other continues with vision testing.

At each site I visited, I found the same familiar, kind, and nurturing environment where children are encouraged and challenged to be their best each day. Every child should have the joy of a Mrs. Kertin or Mrs. Baublits’ experience, and to carry that memory through their lifetime. 

I conclude with my recent experience at the Bonney Lake ECEAP site. There I had quite the encounter with two little boys which I recount here to give you a sense of the joy being a kid can be.

Me: “Hello” to two boys sitting at a table.
Boy One: Can you help me make Iron Man?
Me: GULP! Sure!
Boy Two: He can’t make Iron Man!
Me: I am going to try.
Boy One: Wow, that is cool as I roll out stick leg #1, then two, then a stick body, and arms.
Boy Two: That’s not Iron man!
Boy One: Yes it is! He just got to make his head better.
Me: As I make the head a bit more square and add eyes, mouth and ears.
Boy One: See!
Boy Two: That is really cool!
Me: Whew, thank you boys for your help!
Boy Two: Can you help me make Spiderman?

As you can see from the picture, even though my play dough making skills were put to the ultimate test building Iron Man, I succeeded.
Each day children in ECEAP are succeeding in learning new and different ways to be ready and successful in kindergarten. ECEAP is a needed tool to break the cycle of poverty and homelessness. I’m proud to say that Pierce County ECEAP and its wonderful staff do make a difference!


Thanks for reading, gallery