Now they’ve done it

Now they’ve done it

Executive
The year 2020 has thrown a lot at us.  We started out with mudslides, shifted into a pandemic and we’re still recovering from last week’s wildfires. You may be asking, what could possibly happen, next? Well, sadly, this seemingly doomed calendar year also brought us an environmental mess of disastrous proportions. If you have lived in Pierce County for very long you are very familiar with the name “Puyallup.”  Most of you will know it originates with the tribe of Indians who have always inhabited much of Pierce County. And, they are a key partner with us today. The Puyallup Tribe of Indians works closely with us on environmental stewardship, transportation, economic development, human services and much more. Many of you, like me, may call the city of Puyallup your…
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Days to remember

Days to remember

Executive
Sometimes history focuses on the losses, like the number of buildings destroyed, the financial toll of a tragedy, and, most importantly, the lives lost. And while it is important to take in the gravity of these situations, it’s equally important to celebrate what was saved. An estimated 17,400 people had been at the World Trade Center on the day of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and some 87% of them were safely evacuated, thanks in large part to the first responders’ heroic efforts. [caption id="attachment_2559" align="aligncenter" width="3024"] The First Responders' Memorial at the County-City Building honors those we've lost in the line of duty[/caption] When passengers of United Flight 93 knew the country was under attack and their aircraft was hijacked, Todd Beamer and others took action saying, “Let’s Roll.” Flight…
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The power and importance of education

The power and importance of education

Executive
I don’t think I could believe more strongly in education.  My life has been shaped by my education, from Mr. Dempsey’s 7th Grade class at Curtis Junior High to the Leadership Class at the U.S. Naval Academy, and from Construction Law classes at the University of Washington to Tribal Relations training at Pierce County. These classes have expanded my knowledge, broadened my understanding, and better prepared me for my future. I recently read an article about our own Jeremy Carnahan, wastewater operations supervisor, in “Treatment Plant Operator” Magazine. I have included a link and encourage you to read it, too https://www.tpomag.com/editorial/2020/08/jeremy-carnahan-took-to-wastewater-work-with-a-natural-fascination-for-its-mechanics-and-importance). What stood out to me is Jeremy’s hunger to learn more and become better.  Starting from his service in the Army and critical work done in Iraq, he has…
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